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University of Connecticut Payroll Department

Special Payroll - FAQs
What is the difference between a Primary Authorization and a Regular Authorization? When should each one be used?
A Primary Special Payroll Authorization requires the department to enter payment information into the Time and Attendance System (TAS) every pay period in order for the employee to receive compensation. Primary Authorizations should be used when an employee is being paid based on a rate (e.g. hourly rate, rate per word etc.) or being paid out in a lump sum based upon completion of the work or for certain milestones delivered.

A Regular Special Payroll Authorization results in equal bi-weekly payments every pay period over the appointment term. Regular Authorizations should be used when the employee is being offered a stipend.

How does Special Payroll pay?
Primary Authorizations will produce a pay check two weeks following the pay period in which a payment was entered into TAS. For example, if a payment is entered into TAS for PPE 2/5/15, that compensation will be received in check dated 2/20/15.

Regular Authorizations result in an equal distribution of the stipend over the total number of payments that fall within the time frame of the appointment. The first check is issued two weeks following the pay period in which the employee started and the last check is issued closest to the appointment end date. The stipend is then divided evenly over the total number of checks that will be issued between the first check and final check. The Special Payroll Check Calculator can be used to determine the first check, last check, and bi-weekly payments of a Regular Authorization.

When is my last paycheck?
Employees who are paid via a Primary Authorization (i.e. payments are manually entered into TAS on a bi-weekly basis) will receive their final checks two weeks following the pay period in which they terminated, provided payments were entered into TAS for them. For example, if an employee terminated on 1/6/15 and the department entered a payment into TAS for PPE 1/8/15, the final check will be issued in check dated 1/22/15.

Employees who are paid via a Regular Authorization receive their final pay check closest to the appointment end date. If the end date falls between the Saturday after a pay period end and Friday after the following pay period end, the final check will be issued on that Friday. For example, an end date between Saturday, February 7, 2015 (Saturday after PPE 2/5/15) and Friday, February 20, 2015 (Friday after PPE 2/19/15) will produce a final check on Friday, February 20, 2015.

I forgot to or was unable to enter a payment into TAS for my Special Payroll Employee by the deadline. Can I still pay him/her?
There is no corrected subsidiary process in TAS like there is for corrected time cards. If you have missed the deadline for entering a subsidiary payment into TAS the only way to possibly pay the employee on time is to e-mail the Special Payroll Manager with the following information:
  • Employee name
  • Employee number
  • Total DOLLAR amount owed
  • Account number
  • Total number of weeks the payment covers
The Special Payroll Manager will then let you know if it will be possible for this payment to be manually entered for the next pay check.
We have to end someone early on Special Payroll, what do we need to do?
If the employee is being paid as Regular, then please contact the Special Payroll manager as soon as possible to hopefully prevent the employee from being overpaid. You will then need to follow up with a revised Special Payroll Authorization.

If the employee is being paid as Primary, you may either submit a revised Special Payroll Authorization to make the appropriate changes or you may end the employee in TAS. A Special Payroll Authorization can be ended in TAS on active Subsidiaries only. You will need to select “Yes” to the question “Is this the last time card” and then enter the employee’s last date worked in the box where prompted.

Our department realized that a Special Payroll employee was overpaid. What should we do now?
If you realize that you overpaid a Special Payroll employee, please submit a revised Special Payroll Authorization and offer letter to Payroll as soon as possible. Please inform the employee that they have been overpaid and that the Special Payroll manager will be in contact with him/her concerning the overpayment. Once the paperwork is received in Payroll, the Special Payroll manager will calculate the overpayment amount and contact the employee to let him/her know the amount that will need to be reimbursed to the University. Please do not instruct the employee to send a check to Payroll before the Special Payroll manager has calculated the overpayment.
Can I employ an undergraduate student on Special Payroll?
No, undergraduate students may not be employed on Special Payroll.
When is a Dual Employment Form required?
A Dual Employment Form is required whenever an employee is employed in more than one position with the State of Connecticut. If the Special Payroll position will be the secondary position, then the hiring department must initiate the Dual Employment Form. The Dual is required when the person holds multiple positions between different state agencies, within a single state agency, or even multiple jobs on Special Payroll. For additional questions concerning Dual Employment, please contact Human Resources.
Is a Dual Employment Form required when multiple accounts are being charged?
If multiple accounts are being charged for a single Special Payroll appointment, that is not considered Dual Employment.
What is the “12th-12th Rule” for faculty members?
Per the Policy on Extra Compensation for Full-time Faculty in AAUP (http://policy.uconn.edu/?p=366), faculty members may earn, over the course of a year, no more than the twelve month equivalent of his/her base annual salary. Exceptions include consulting and prizes or awards. A year is defined by the academic year and starts with 8/23 of the beginning of the academic year and ends on 8/22 of the end of the academic year. For example, a nine month faculty member with an annual salary of $60,000.00 can earn an additional $20,000.00 (equivalent to 3 months) on Special Payroll in an academic year.

Faculty who are teaching during Summer and Intersessions, and have reached their 12th-12th maximums, may accumulate the additional funds in a special departmental account to be used by the faculty member for legitimate business expenses with approval of the Department Head, per the Memorandum of Agreement on Summer and Intersession Compensation. Faculty may not have direct control of the special departmental account these funds are distributed to. Faculty members who wish to accumulate additional funds above their 12th-12th maximums must contact Human Resources for the appropriate paperwork.

What is the maximum number of credits an Adjunct can teach in a semester?
The maximum number of credits an Adjunct can teach in any one semester is 8. UCPEA employees who are teaching as Adjuncts on Special Payroll are restricted to teaching no more than 4 credits in a single semester and no more than 6 credits within an academic year (Fall through Summer). State retirees teaching as Adjuncts on Special Payroll are restricted to teaching no more than 8 credits in a single semester and no more than 12 credits within a calendar year (January through December). Please contact Human Resources if an Adjunct will be exceeding these credit limits as any exceptions must first be granted by Human Resources and/or AAUP.
Why is my Special Payroll payment lower than expected?
For employees who are on Regular Payroll (e.g. Faculty, UCPEA) and also employed on Special Payroll, the Special Payroll earnings are considered supplemental income and must be taxed at a flat 25% for Federal tax withholdings. State tax, FICA, and applicable retirement deductions are also withheld as usual. If you are on Regular Payroll and will have substantial earnings on Special Payroll, you may elect to adjust your Federal W-4 to have fewer taxes withheld from your Regular paycheck to offset the higher Federal tax withholdings on Special Payroll.

Another reason that a Special Payroll payment may be lower than expected is because of any variation in the gross pay of any one check. The higher the gross pay of any one payment, the more taxes may be withheld especially if that higher payment bumps you up into a higher tax withholding bracket. Adjuncts who teach during the Fall and Spring semesters generally receive their stipends spread out over 8 checks, but during the Winter Intersession and Summer Sessions, the same course load and stipend are spread out over fewer checks (usually 1 check for Winter Intersession and 2 to 3 for the Summer Sessions). Each check during the Winter Intersession or Summer Sessions is going to be higher than each check during the Fall or Spring semesters, generally resulting in more taxes withheld from each check. For example, a $5,000.00 stipend paid in one check during the Winter Intersession will be taxed much more heavily than that same $5,000.00 stipend paid out over 8 checks because a gross bi-weekly amount of $625.00 per each of 8 checks is lower than a gross bi-weekly amount of $5,000.00 for one check.

When is NetID created/re-activated for a Special Payroll hire? How do we know when the NetID and e-mail are active?
NetID and e-mail are generally created/re-activated for a Special Payroll employee after the Special Payroll Authorization has been processed by Payroll. After the Payroll Authorization has been processed, the information is picked up in a nightly feed to UITS where NetID and e-mail are either created for a new hire or re-activated when a valid NetID and e-mail already exist within the system.

The easiest way to determine if a Special Payroll employee has an active NetID and e-mail is to check the UConn Global Address Book. If the employee shows up in the UConn Global Address Book, he/she should have an active NetID and can either contact UITS for assistance or go to the NetID Homepage (https://netid.uconn.edu/) for additional information. NetID and e-mail are only created based on the nightly feed, so you should check the UConn Global Address Book only once per day to find out if your employee’s NetID and e-mail have been created/re-activated.

I am a rehired retiree, how can I change my Direct Deposit?
As a retiree, your direct deposit information is maintained by the State Retirement Services Division. You will not be able to update or change your Direct Deposit information directly with UConn. You can make changes to Direct Deposit by completing the following form and sending it directly to the Office of the State Comptrollers Retirement Services Division (contact information is listed on the form): http://www.osc.ct.gov/agencies/forms/pdf/CO-1068%20REV.%208-2011.pdf. Please keep in mind that whatever direct deposit information you have set up with the Retirement Services Division will also be applied to your job at UConn.
Can a rehired retiree have a Secondary Direct Deposit Account?
At this time, the Retirement Services Division does not allow for a Secondary Direct Deposit Account for retirees.
How can a rehired retiree change his/her mailing address?
As a retiree, your personal information is also maintained by the Retirement Services Division. You will be unable to change your address directly with UConn. You can make changes to your address by completing the following form and sending it directly to the Office of the State Comptrollers Retirement Services Division (contact information is listed on the form): http://www.osc.ct.gov/agencies/forms/pdf/CO-1082REV7-2013.pdf. Please keep in mind that whatever mailing address you have set up with the Retirement Services Division will also be applied to your job at UConn.
Who handles tax forms for retirees?
Tax information on your retiree record is separate from your tax information within you current employment. You may submit Federal and State W-4s to the UConn Payroll Department for processing. Your W-4 elections will be applied to your current employment only and will not affect your withholdings on your retirement record.
Will deductions on the employment record be impacted (e.g. 403(b) deduction) by my status as a retiree?
Any deductions, such as a 403(b) deduction, will continue as scheduled on your employment record.